710,000 Bq/Kg of Cesium-134/137 detected from “iron sand” gathered by neodymium magnets

710,000 Bq/Kg of Cesium-134/137 detected from “iron sand” gathered by neodymium magnets

Photo : Wikipedia

 

Extremely radioactive material was gathered by magnet.

The sampling location was “Kaiseizan park” in Kohriyama city Fukushima. (cf, Reality in Fukushima [URL])

The sampling date was 5/18/2013.

 

The analyst comments, “Gathered iron sand by neodymium magnet in a parking lot. The amount was only as small as the top of thumb”.

Cs-134 density was 234,907 Bq/Kg, Cs-137 density was 479,318 Bq/Kg. The total density of Cs-134/137 was 714,225 Bq/Kg. This is 7,143 times much as Japanese food safety limit.

 

710,000 Bq:Kg of Cesium-134:137 detected from iron sand gathered by neodymium magnets

 

 

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/55244556/SPViewer/spviewer.html#__130518_%E9%96%8B%E6%88%90%E5%B1%B1%E5%85%AC%E5%9C%92%E9%A7%90%E8%BB%8A%E5%A0%B4%E7%A0%82%E3%83%8D%E3%82%AA%E3%82%B8%E3%83%A0%E5%90%B8%E7%9D%80_130m.txt//0

 

https://mobile.twitter.com/M8100/status/487924422422962176

 

 

You read this now because we’ve been surviving until today.

_____

Français :

710 000 Bq/kg de césium 134/137 dans de la “limaille de fer” collectées avec des aimants au néodyme

 

Photo : Wikipedia

Une radioactivité extrêmement élevée a été récoltée avec des aimants.
L’échantillonnage a été fait dans le “parc Kaiseizan” de la ville de Kohriyama dans Fukushima. (cf. La réalité à Fukushima)
Il date du 18 mai 2013.

L’analyste déclare “On a ramassé de la limaille avec des aimants au néodyme dans un parking. Il n’y en avait pas plus que le bout du pouce”.
Le Cs 134 était à 234 907 Bq/kg, le Cs 137 à 479 318 Bq/kg. La radioactivité totale en césium était de 714 225 Bq/kg. C’est 7 143 fois la limite de sécurité alimentaire japonaise.

710,000 Bq:Kg of Cesium-134:137 detected from iron sand gathered by neodymium magnets

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/55244556/SPViewer/spviewer.html#__130518_%E9%96%8B%E6%88%90%E5%B1%B1%E5%85%AC%E5%9C%92%E9%A7%90%E8%BB%8A%E5%A0%B4%E7%A0%82%E3%83%8D%E3%82%AA%E3%82%B8%E3%83%A0%E5%90%B8%E7%9D%80_130m.txt//0

https://mobile.twitter.com/M8100/status/487924422422962176

Vous pouvez lire ceci parce que nous avons survécu jusqu’à aujourd’hui.

Comments

  1. Bill Duff
    Bill Duff 14 July, 2014, 06:00

    Support by eating

    These ‘iron’ filings are ‘Hot’. This appears to be a somewhat unusual magnetic material. Is there a Gamma Reading as well as the radiocesium Beta Emission?

    This material should be further analyzed, IMHPO. I don’t recall that the earlier Fukushima ‘Black Dust’ was ever described as a magnetic substance before.

    Reply this comment
  2. Bill Duff
    Bill Duff 14 July, 2014, 18:50

    The most common Iron radioisotope has a half-life of about 30 minutes.

    Some of the (steel) alloy metals in steel have various, longer half-lives.

    Gadolinium is a chemical element with symbol Gd and atomic number 64. It is a silvery-white, malleable and ductile rare-earth metal. Gadolinium metal possesses unusual metallurgic properties, to the extent that as little as 1% gadolinium can significantly improve the workability and resistance to high temperature oxidation of iron, chromium, and related alloys. Gadolinium as a metal or salt has exceptionally high absorption of neutrons and therefore is used for shielding in neutron radiography and in nuclear reactors.

    Ferromagnetic properties have not been previously reported for the Fukushima Black Dust, to the best of my present recollection.

    Reply this comment
  3. Bill Duff
    Bill Duff 15 July, 2014, 08:27

    Very Little FDU-3 nuclear fuel remains

    The two (2) year half-life Cesium-134 in this ferromagnetic material points inexorably to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Everything else about the ‘Black-Sand’, points more particularly to the FDU-3 Nuclear Explosion of 03/14/2011. It is HIGHLY unlikely that a substantial amount of fuel remains in the FDU-3 nuclear reactor. Perhaps for a WAG:

    10% Scattered to the winds, in the atomic explosion
    15% Located in the bottom of the reactor
    20% Located in the Torus and plumbing.
    20% Located in the Metal Shell & Concrete Containment Area
    35% Burned through into the Groundwater Table

    Wild Ass Guess for FDU-3 Nuclear Reactor Fuel Location. Hopefully, substantial fuel remains in the FDU-3 Spent Fuel Pool, which contained 25X as much fuel as the reactor; at the time of the reactor atomic explosion.

    Reply this comment

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